Periods and Waves: A Conference on Sound and History

A promising conference on historical sound studies, Periods and Waves: A Conference on Sound and History, will take place April 29–30, 2016 at Stony Brook University. Plenary speakers include Emma Dillon (King’s College London), Stefan Helmreich (MIT), Alexander Rehding (Harvard), and Emily Thompson (Princeton). Final deadline for abstracts is December 31, 2015, so there’s still time to submit!

Here’s the blurb from the CFP:

Sound, like history, describes a dynamic terrain. Scholars concerned with the convergence of sound and history have, in the wake of the “sensory turn” in the humanities, worked to generate clear narratives from data that resists fixity, that seems to be in constant motion. The shared aims of sound studies and history have yielded a rich body of scholarship that interrogates, for example, the noisy illuminations of medieval songbooks, acoustic control in modern architecture, sound and the moving image, accounts of deafness and synaesthesia, and the production of aural subjects through consumer technology. The practice of thinking sound historically and history sonically is driving the growth of fresh methodologies and compelling new interpretations of sources.

Periods and Waves: A Conference on Sound and History is co-organized by the Department of Music, Department of Philosophy, and the School of Health Technology & Management at Stony Brook University, with the aim of bringing together humanities scholars and humanistic scientists, particularly those working in sound studies. We welcome submissions for 30-minute papers, panels, and workshops from scholars in the myriad disciplines that investigate past aural cultures, including musicology, ethnomusicology, history, anthropology, medical history, art history, philosophy, religion, disability studies, acoustics, and sound studies.

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